It’s 2017 and we are seeing positive changes throughout the world towards LGBTQ+ rights. Germany, Taiwan &  Ireland are just a few of the countries that have voted YES for same-sex marriage, as well as the rise of awareness throughout the community, we are seeing massive changes.

However, some countries are still ‘punishing’ those who identify within the LGBTQ community. Some of the things I have read whilst researching are extremely upsetting, so keep that in mind whilst reading. This post hopefully, will shed light onto those who are still suffering in silence.

Brazil

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In our post Wake Up Brazil, we have shared our views of Brazil recently passing a law to use the very controversial ‘gay conversion therapy’. This method has the idiotic ideology that gayness can be cured, which is ludicrous.

Now… I am fully aware that this therapy has been around for centuries and is practiced all over the world. But my main issue here is that it’s 2017 and we are only just passing this law, with the amount of education and resources available, this should not be happening.

Without living in Brazil, we can’t truly understand what these individuals go through… so!

AMANDA CUNHA LIVING IN BRAZIL

The way queer people are treated in Brazil is kind of contradictory. For example, it’s very rare to see people protesting against the LGBT+ in pride parades or saying things like “gay people must die” in social media.

On the other hand, here we have something we call “hidden prejudice”. This includes but is not limited to depreciating jokes, mean comments and hateful judgements people say to family and friends, when they think they’re away from queer individuals. But that does not mean there aren’t psychological, verbal and even physical violence against us here. We have the biggest homicide rate of trans people and words made to make LGBT+ people feel bad.

So, being queer in Brazil isn’t easy – you’ll always be judged by someone and very likely you’ll face discrimination more than once in your life for being who you are. But as an activist that must believe we’re making progress, I think things are getting better, especially with the younger generation. Even if they still present signs of that hidden prejudice, generally they’re way more accepting and understanding than the older ones. But if you ask me, I’d say that even the adults are becoming better and not tolerating explicit homophobia anymore. It’s not a big advance, I know, but even a little is better than nothing and I truly believe that step by step, were becoming a more tolerating country.

Something that shows that was the commotion on social media about the law that allowed conversion therapy on homosexual people. Most people were strongly against it and it filled by heart with hope that someday we can overcome all this prejudice and finally accept the difference between all human beings.

Like everywhere, there will always be some minority who will have a negative opinion on other people. But as Amanda has mentioned, we have to hold on to the hope that things will keep on improving. No matter how little or slow the progress, every little bit makes a difference and it’ll drive us to keep fighting for the equality we all deserve.

Sadly, we live in a world where we are a minority, but we have to keep holding onto the hope that will we be treated as equals.

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Brazil is just one of many countries that discriminate against LGBTQ+ members. In 13 countries, being gay or bisexual is punishable by death. These are; Sudan, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Mauritania, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Qatar, UAE, parts of Nigeria, parts of Somalia, parts of Syria and parts of Iraq.

That’s right, your sexuality can get you a death sentence in certain countries & it’s unimaginable to believe that this can happen. Being LGBT+ is not a choice, why would any choose to be judged & even killed.

The world around us all hold different views & opinions due to religion or their culture & we can’t force everyone to believe in the same views. For example, in Turkmenistan, Sierra Leone and Zimbabwe homosexuality is illegal for men but legal for women. So only some of us are being discriminated & others are being able to live freely.

How that makes sense to their leaders, is something I will never understand. But am I surprised? Sadly, no. You see, the world is a scary place & the more I have researched and viewed what these individuals go through, I’m not surprised that due to gender people are being discriminated. I’m not surprised that we are judged on our sexuality or gender preferences.

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The world is developing & growing and just like us, it takes time for views to change. We are seeing positives changes as shown in Malta it became the first European country to ban conversion therapy.

So the world is changing its views. 

But there will always be countries that hold different views & we can’t change that. What we can do is fight for their rights, no matter where you are in this world you are valid no matter your sexuality & gender.

I am deeply saddened by what happens in the world regarding its LGBTQ+ members, living in the UK we don’t experience anything extreme like the rest of the world. We should appreciate the freedom we have compared to others & be grateful that we are living in a country that supports our rights.

Below is a gallery of pictures we made to promote the inequality LGBTQ+ rights throughout the world, feel free to use them & help us promote that #weneedequality! 


Related Posts

Sexism, Racism, Classism & Homophobia – Here I come!  – The Pink Agendist

Homosexuality and Homophobia – Views of a Teenager

Wake Up Brazil – Unite UK

 

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